Better Security, Mindful Artists Prevent Concert Mayhem

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Clear Channel Muse played their second-to-last American concert date of the year at iHeartRadio in Las Vegas last night, and after next month’s Austin City Limits , it might be a while before fans see them again Stateside. “Next year, we may do one festival or two, but were probably going to concentrate on getting into a new album,” Muses Matt Bellamy told Rolling Stone backstage at iHeartRadio. But fans will get a chance to experience a Muse concert in almost lifelike form, since the band will be releasing a concert film. “Over the summer, we played this massive gig in Rome Olympic Stadium, that was probably the best gig of the year,” Bellamy said. “Its gonna come out in 4K, which is the highest resolution concert ever shot. Its four times more powerful than HD, so its like ridiculous detail. When you see the concert being filmed, you can see all the crowd, you can see their faces being filmed.” See Where Muse Ranks on Our List of the 50 Greatest Live Acts Right Now The exact release plans are still up in the air, but Bellamy said he expects it to get a limited theatrical release in the U.S., including some Imax screens. It’s a rare occurence for a festival-headlining band big enough to have its own concert film to serve as an opening act, but Muse did so last night in Vegas when they performed before Queen.”Events like this didnt exist a few years ago and we are playing withtechnically opening forQueen tonight,” Bellamy said before the show. “At any point in our career, I wouldnt have thought wed actually get a chance to play with them.” The eclecticism of the iHeart lineup, which also included Elton John this year, proved an educational experience for Muse’s drummer, Dominic Howard.”Having some of those older greats on stage and seeing them play is wicked, because you can still learn so much from a lot of those kind of people that have been around for a while and got more experience than you,” he said. Bellamy also finds it inspiring. “Its odd because when you start out, you perceive those acts as being something really quite long before we even were born, but also well before we started,” he said. “And to somehow end up on a bill with them is quite strange because it makes you think, ‘How old are these people?’ I suppose it gives you hope for making music as an old person.”

At Farm Aid concert, wholesome food helps augment the music and the fundraising

So our Homegrown criteria call for food that is sourced from family farms that meet an ecological standard, and that returns a fair price to the farmer. Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Dave Matthews and John Mellencamp lead the star-studded lineup this year, along with Jack Johnson, Carlene Carter, Toad the Wet Sprocket and about 10 other artists. The annual concert is the chief moneymaker for the Farm Aid organization Nelson co-founded in 1985 and leads as president. The beneficiaries of the organizations year-round efforts are always featured prominently at the shows, with a Homegrown Village providing concert-goers a chance to meet local farmers, learn agrarian skills, and eat food from vendors who meet strict criteria set by Farm Aid. We talk about saving the family farmer, but the fact is, its the family farmer who will save us all, Nelson said at a media event before the gates opened at noon Saturday. Matthews gave a shout-out to activists wearing anti-fracking T-shirts at the media event, which was also open to many farmers, vendors and volunteers. Dont frack our farmlands, Matthew said, to loud applause. Several anti-fracking groups from New York and Pennsylvania had a booth at the event, calling for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to continue the states moratorium on shale gas development that began in 2008. During a performance Saturday night, Pete Seeger modified a line of This Land is Your Land, declaring New York was meant to be frack-free. This year the village was set up on the expansive lawns of the state park surrounding the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. The action there got going before the 10-hour concert. The village offered plenty of activities to help people get in touch with their inner farmer. Theres a daylong group potato-stamp art project; workshops on making butter, bacon, cheese, lemon vinegar and llama wool bracelets; and a demonstration of how to grow shiitake mushrooms on logs in your own backyard.

Carter Show World Tour” at the Barclays Center on August 3 in New York. She is currently in the midst of the tour’s Latin American leg. (Photo: Kevin Mazur) Beyonce was dragged off stage by a fan at a concert in Brazil last weekend Other pop stars such as Justin Bieber and One Direction have suffered concert attacks It’s key to “let audiences know what their limitations are,” one expert says SHARE 4 CONNECT 8 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE She may be Queen Bey to many, but that doesn’t mean Beyonce is always treated like royalty during her shows. Especially when her throngs of adoring fans are crazy in love. Not only did the pop star’s luscious locks get caught in an electric fan during a July performance, the reigning diva has also been spanked by a Copenhagen concertgoer in May and pulled off stage by another at a Brazil show last weekend (resulting in this hilarious, albeit terrifying, image ). Mrs. Carter’s bad-luck streak may seem like an anomaly (her Latin American tour has continued without incident and stops in Venezuela tonight and Colombia on Sunday), but in fact, these crazed fan incidents happen to nearly every pop star. Concertgoers have rushed the stage at Miley Cyrus , Demi Lovato and Taylor Swift shows. Justin Bieber was attacked by a fan during a Dubai performance, resulting in an upturned piano. Even One Direction’s Harry Styles suffered a blow to the groin after a concertgoer threw a shoe at him in February. “They want to get as close as possible,” says Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, which covers the concert industry. “It’s just a fan being overly exuberant that could in fact hurt the performer or anyone else around them if they don’t act rationally.